Books and Articles on Focusing Research

See Gendlin (1982) and Cornell (1996) in the General Interest section on Psychology and Therapy for more information on focusing itself.

Theory and Research in Counselling and Psychotherapy

Focusing Research

Clark, A.C. (1990) A Comprehensive Process Analayis of Focusing Events in Experiential Therapy. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Toledo, Ohio.

This doctoral dissertation has been cited for additional evidence of the importance of the 'handle' step in focusing (as in Nakata and Murayama (1986)).

Nakata, Y. and S. Murayama (1986) 'Handle-giving Technique to Get a Felt Sense', Research Bulletin of Educational Psychology, Faculty of Education, Kyushu University, 31: 65-72.

This study suggests the act of giving a felt sense a 'handle', or label, is more effective than the subsequent asking step in deepening the focuser's experience. Also see Clark (1990).

Tamura, R. (1987) 'Floatability: A Focuser Variable Related to Success in Focusing', Japanese Journal of Humanistic Psychology 5: 83-87.

See Tamura and Murayama (1988) for notes on this article, plus Tamura (1990).

Tamura, R. (1990) 'The Interrelation Between the Focuser-Listener Relationship and the Focuser's Floatability During Focusing', Journal of Japanese Clinical Psychology 8: 16-25.

See Tamura and Murayama (1988) for notes on this article, plus Tamura (1987).

Tamura, R. and S. Murayama (1988) 'Are Symbolizations Indispensable for the Process of Personality Change? A Consideration from Focusing Cases', Research Bulletin of Educational Psychology, Faculty of Education, Kyushu University 33: 135-44.

Together with Tamura (1987) and Tamura (1990), this article suggests that clients experience positive feelings of self-acceptance and of reduced 'internal disorganizations' as a result of focusing. Also see Nakata and Murayama (1986) on the benefits of focusing.

   

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This page was last reviewed by Dr Greg Mulhauser, Saturday, 11 November 2017.