Psychology and Therapy: Intuitive Eating Books and Articles

This sub-section covers a specific approach to nutrition and weight management called 'intuitive eating'; a separate section under Eating Disorders covers research on intuitive eating.

Psychology and Therapy

Self-Help (Intuitive Eating)

This sub-section covers a specific approach to nutrition and weight management called 'intuitive eating'; a separate section under Eating Disorders covers research on intuitive eating.

Hawks, S.R. (2001). Making Peace with the Image in the Mirror: Spiritual Solutions for Self-Esteem and Inner Acceptance. Salt Lake City: Bookcraft. [Amazon UK | Amazon US]

Making Peace with the Image in the Mirror explores the relationship between body image and self-esteem. It discusses our need for love and acceptance and offers valuable suggestions for developing ourselves in ways that will enable us to meet those needs. It presents spiritual solutions that emphasize ways we can ignore the destructive demand of the media and cultrual influences, and instead find true self-esteem, peace and happiness.

Hirschmann, J. R., & Munter, C. H. (1989). Overcoming Overeating. New York: Fawcett Columbine. [Amazon UK | Amazon US]

Authors Hirschmann and Munter are psychotherapists in New York City. In this book, they explore concepts such as: Diet/binge; Good food/bad food; Punishment/reward; These are the compulsive eater's nightmares, a longtime pattern of recrimination and guilt that ultimately leads to more overeating and more weight gain. This book contains a proven, step-by-step plan that doesn't control your eating habits--but cures them, once and for all. Authors Hirschmann and Munter are psychotherapists in New York City. In this book, they explore concepts such as: Diet/binge; Good food/bad food; Punishment/reward; These are the compulsive eater's nightmares, a longtime pattern of recrimination and guilt that ultimately leads to more overeating and more weight gain. This book contains a proven, step-by-step plan that doesn't control your eating habits--but cures them, once and for all.

Hirschmann, J. R., & Munter, C. H. (1997). When Women Stop Hating Their Bodies: Freeing yourself from food and weight obsession. New York: Fawcett Book Group. [Amazon UK | Amazon US]

Bestselling authors Munter and Hirschmann explore the myriad reasons why women cling to diets despite overwhelming evidence that diets don't work. In fact, diets turn us into compulsive eaters who are obsessed with food and weight. Munter and Hirschmann call this syndrome "Bad Body Fever" and demonstrate how "bad body thoughts" are clues to our emotional lives. They explore the difficulties women encounter replacing dieting with demand feeding. And finally, they teach us how to think about our problems rather than eat about them--so that food can resume its proper place in our lives.

Pipher, M. (1995). Hunger Pains: The Modern Woman's Tragic Quest for Thinness. New York: Ballantine Books. [Amazon UK | Amazon US]

The rates of anorexia, bulimia and depression for women are the highest they have ever been, and begin at ever younger ages. Dr. Pipher reveals how society encourages our misery and prevents us from accepting our looks. Indeed, for many women, the humiliation of overweight or obesity is a wound that never heals. Dr. Pipher reminds us that accepting our bodies the way they are is the greatest gift we can give ourselves.

Pipher, M. (1994). Reviving Ophelia: Saving the Selves of Adolescent Girls. New York: Ballantine Books. [Amazon UK | Amazon US]

According to Dr. Mary Pipher, a clinical psychologist who has treated girls for more than twenty years, we live in a look-obsessed, media-saturated, "girl-poisoning" culture. Despite the advances of feminism, escalating levels of sexism and violence--from undervalued intelligence to sexual harassment in elementary school--cause girls to stifle their creative spirit and natural impulses, which, ultimately, destroys their self-esteem. Yet girls often blame themselves or their families for this "problem with no name" instead of looking at the world around them.This book contains girls' unmuted voices from the front lines of adolescence, personal and painfully honest. By laying bare their harsh day-to-day reality, Reviving Ophelia issues a call to arms and offers parents compassion, strength, and strategies with which to revive these Ophelias' lost sense of self.

Tribole, E., & Resch, E. (2003). Intuitive Eating: A revoluntionary program that works. New York: St. Martin's Griffen. [Amazon UK | Amazon US]

Registered Dieticians Tribole and Resch suggest that the best way for dieters to finally make peace with food and body image is to emulate the natural, intuitive eating habits of very young children. Key suggestions include rejecting a diet; eating only when hungry; stopping when full; and learning to separate emotional from physical needs. No menus or food plans to follow here; the authors encourage readers to eat anything they want, as long as they pay attention to the tenets of feeling true hunger and true satisfaction. Ultimately, old habits subside and body and mind work together to achieve the "natural healthy weight."

   

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This page was last reviewed by Dr Greg Mulhauser, Saturday, 11 November 2017.